Archive for the ‘Bonsai Pot’s’ Category

Today was a rather unusual day here at the nursery because we had local TV crew from CBC shooting for a sort programme being shown at 9:00am on the 31st of March.

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So the last few day’s we have been cleaning up the nursery etc. This included cleaning out the two tea rooms and putting up two tokonoma’s. It was fun to do, as normally it’s a rare thing here as were not a museum.

(Not really the weather for it but, it had cleared off by the time they got here.)

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Here are the two Tokonoma displays we helped Oyakata to set up.

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An Akamatsu/red pine.

The other on was an Ume. This tree was one of the original founding japanese plums (one of 1000 grown from seed) that were planted by Oyakata’s great-grandfather when he first set up the nursery over 100 years ago. It has never been grafted.

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There is also a display area adjacent to one of the Tokonoma’s, a tribute to Oyakata’s farther.

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Also in the tea room on display are a few of Oyakata’s pot collection. His farther never collected pot’s, it is a ‘hobby’ that he took up himself. His knowledge is astounding considering it is all he learnt himself.

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It was a fun, interesting afternoon and it certainly made a change from the normally daily routine here.

Thanks for reading.

Recently the weather here in Japan has been very warm, so warm that it has been dangerous/too stressful to work on the tree’s and has only just started up again lately. So, I thought I’d post a few pot’s that caught my eye recently around the nursery.

First up is a Ino Shukuho pot which, is about 18cm long.

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Those eagle eye’d people/pot nerds may have noticed that this isn’t Ino Shukuho even though the stamp is correct, it is a Chinese fake!
There are a few things which give it away. First is the clay type which, is too dark and different to any other Shukuho I’ve seen before.
Secondly it is oval. Although Shukuho has done oval’s they are pretty unusual.
Thirdly the glaze isn’t a Shukuho glaze, at least I’ve not seen one like it.
For these reasons the pot caught my eye and I didn’t realise it was a fake. When Oyakata point it out that it was a fake, it seemed obvious.

Let’s take a look at real Shukuho which I spotted here recently.

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You can see the difference.
This is also shukuho’s signature glaze inspired by Heian Tofukuji and is the biggest Shukuho pot I’ve seen at just over 40cms long.

This is a nakawatari Chinese antique pot.

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I first spotted this pot lurking under a pile of pots in a cabinet. You could see that it was glazed the whole of the inside, it led me to believe that it might well be a suiban which had a hole drilled out to make it into a pot which, isn’t that uncommon. On closer inspection you could see that the hole was glazed so,it certainly was not.
The pot is very nice and made of porcelain so, I believe is hand carved. I would dread to think how difficult it would be to carve a pot in this shape and to such a high quality that it is.
The chop on the pot actually refers to the time period that the pot was made rather than the actual maker of the pot.
Not an easy pot to fit with a tree, but I’d try my best if it was mine. Unfortunately Oyakata wants to keep this one and I certainly don’t blame him.

This is a more modern Mino Kenzan Tokoname pot.

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Mino Kenzan is known for being on the higher side of quality, in modern Tokoname pots and I don’t think this one is any exception. The clay is a nice colour, the thickness of the pot is elegantly thin and the finish round the feet is good, although there are slight marks it is very clean (something I always look at on pots. The finish in area’s where they won’t be displayed is a sign of a pot maker taking pride I think).
The size of the pot is just over 34cm which makes it uncommon for Kenzan’s work as most of his pot’s are shohin.
I really like this pot and being modern Japanese quite a reasonable price so, I bought it and it will be coming home one day.

Lastly we have another Chinese antique.

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Some nice patina.

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Some strange holes in the feet, maybe how the feet are formed?

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A really nice red clay pot which my photo’s don’t do justice. Also another one that Oyakata wants to keep, see a pattern forming?

Thanks for reading.

Takao Koyo

Posted: July 8, 2013 in Bonsai Pot's, Japan
Tags: , ,

Here is a group of shohin/mame pots made by Takao Koyo which are here, at Aichi-en. I like Takao Koyo and I thought I’d post them here. They are well made Japanese pots, good quality and a reasonable price.

A nice yellow pot would go well with many deciduous species and would give added interest in a shohin display. 12.3cm in length and 3.5cm depth (external).

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A nice cream pot and a very versatile colour. 12.2cm long 3.2cm deep.

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A group or root over rock pot. Would go well with a trident maple/kaede. 18.2cm long and 1.9cm deep.

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A mame green pot. 8.5cm long and 3.3cm deep.

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A round grey crackle mame/small accent pot. 5.3cm across and 2.3/2.4 deep.

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A couple of group shot’s.

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Oyakata is selling the group for $600 which, sounds pretty good to me. I don’t expect they will hang around long at that price.

Thanks for reading.

As I mentioned yesterday Oyakata kindly bid on a lot at the auction for me and won it. I think it was a close run thing because the seller pushed the price up and I think he wanted more. Oyakata stuck with my maximum bid and an agreement was made at that price.

The item I won is a chuhin size Suzuki Syuzan pot which is a Japanese, fairly modern pot maker. Syuzan is a very high quality pot maker who made pots in Nagoya. For that reason I thought it would be fitting to buy one as a momento of my trip to Aichi-en. The pots are considered such high quality that they are used along with Chinese antiques in Kokufu. For more information about Syuzan pots please refur to Peter Tea’s and Ryan Bell’s website’s.

Some nice patina on the pot.

Some nice patina on the pot.

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The chop

The chop

Well this isn’t actually my second purchase because when I came to pay Oyakata this morning he said that the first pot was a gift and I only had to pay the difference. Which was very kind of him and I’m very grateful. He’s a great guy, I feel very lucky to be here at this nursery and it only makes me hope more that I can get a position here at Aichi-en.

Thanks for reading.

It’s been about a week now and it’s been tough/hard work in some ways but, I was prepared for it, I love it and wouldn’t have it any other way. It’s made me a little lazy on the posting front I have to say which I’m sorry for but, I can understand why some Apprentice’s with blog’s don’t post that often.

I made my first purchase today which was a pot. I had been pretty good till now but, I really couldn’t help myself. When I started out in bonsai my focus was always about the tree’s and I wasn’t really interested in the pot’s they were in. Later as I began to understand more about the tree and pot coming together to become one and harmonise (The pot making the tree and vice versa). I started to appreciate them a lot, to the point that I love them just as much as I do the tree’s now.

The pot I’ve bought is a Chinese pot. Chinese pots get a really bad press from all the mass market rubbish that those cheap Chinese elms come in but, if you didn’t know already a huge amount of the trees exhibited in the top shows in Japan are in antique Chinese pots. The Japanese believe if you have a quality old tree you need a quality old pot to put it in which, I totally understand.

The pot I have bought isn’t an antique but, it is a shinto high quality pot which was made in the 60’s. If I remember rightly the Chinese had a surge of making high quality pots around that time up to the 80’s.

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I really love the glaze on this pot which, I’ve seen pictures of this kind of glaze in pictures of Chinese pots. The glaze goes all round the bottom of the pot and on the feet which only signifies the effort and quality gone in to the pot. Also the indentation in the bottom of the pot and that it’s not just flat I think is another quality sign.
There is a good amount of patina forming on the pot from the last 50 years or so which really gives it an aged look.
The pot is a real useful size for a large shohin. I don’t have a tape measure handy unfortunately so can’t give exact measurements.
I don’t have any trees lined up for it but, I’m sure it will find a partner at some point. It quite easily could be used with many different types tree’s (maples, elms, flowering tree’s, etc).
I’m unsure how frost resistant it will be in the UK despite it’s quality and I don’t think I would really risk it to be honest. It will be used as an exhibition pot and not as a permanent home for a tree back in the UK.

Theirs a bonsai auction tomorrow, I’m running and I need my beauty sleep.

Thanks for reading.