Handful of pots

Posted: August 23, 2013 in Bonsai Pot's, Japan
Tags: , , ,

Recently the weather here in Japan has been very warm, so warm that it has been dangerous/too stressful to work on the tree’s and has only just started up again lately. So, I thought I’d post a few pot’s that caught my eye recently around the nursery.

First up is a Ino Shukuho pot which, is about 18cm long.

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Those eagle eye’d people/pot nerds may have noticed that this isn’t Ino Shukuho even though the stamp is correct, it is a Chinese fake!
There are a few things which give it away. First is the clay type which, is too dark and different to any other Shukuho I’ve seen before.
Secondly it is oval. Although Shukuho has done oval’s they are pretty unusual.
Thirdly the glaze isn’t a Shukuho glaze, at least I’ve not seen one like it.
For these reasons the pot caught my eye and I didn’t realise it was a fake. When Oyakata point it out that it was a fake, it seemed obvious.

Let’s take a look at real Shukuho which I spotted here recently.

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You can see the difference.
This is also shukuho’s signature glaze inspired by Heian Tofukuji and is the biggest Shukuho pot I’ve seen at just over 40cms long.

This is a nakawatari Chinese antique pot.

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I first spotted this pot lurking under a pile of pots in a cabinet. You could see that it was glazed the whole of the inside, it led me to believe that it might well be a suiban which had a hole drilled out to make it into a pot which, isn’t that uncommon. On closer inspection you could see that the hole was glazed so,it certainly was not.
The pot is very nice and made of porcelain so, I believe is hand carved. I would dread to think how difficult it would be to carve a pot in this shape and to such a high quality that it is.
The chop on the pot actually refers to the time period that the pot was made rather than the actual maker of the pot.
Not an easy pot to fit with a tree, but I’d try my best if it was mine. Unfortunately Oyakata wants to keep this one and I certainly don’t blame him.

This is a more modern Mino Kenzan Tokoname pot.

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Mino Kenzan is known for being on the higher side of quality, in modern Tokoname pots and I don’t think this one is any exception. The clay is a nice colour, the thickness of the pot is elegantly thin and the finish round the feet is good, although there are slight marks it is very clean (something I always look at on pots. The finish in area’s where they won’t be displayed is a sign of a pot maker taking pride I think).
The size of the pot is just over 34cm which makes it uncommon for Kenzan’s work as most of his pot’s are shohin.
I really like this pot and being modern Japanese quite a reasonable price so, I bought it and it will be coming home one day.

Lastly we have another Chinese antique.

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Some nice patina.

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Some strange holes in the feet, maybe how the feet are formed?

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A really nice red clay pot which my photo’s don’t do justice. Also another one that Oyakata wants to keep, see a pattern forming?

Thanks for reading.

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Comments
  1. japanesepots says:

    John,
    Not a method of forming the feet, but one of attaching them. One sees this often in old Owari Yaki porcelain pots.
    And as to the Ino: definitely! I’ve seen a lot of them, mostly dark blue banded ovals, identical clay and totally fake!! This is one of the better ones. Most are single color dark blue.
    Good post! Keel it up!

  2. japanesepots says:

    Oh, and one other thing. In not sure Mino Kenzan is from Tokoname…I do think, he’s from, well, Mino. Lol.

  3. stribouille says:

    Hello John,

    I bought a fake pot like the first one on a store in France. Thnak’s to you and Ryan, I know it’s a fake 😥 I’ll not put my tree inside. Fu*k this bad store.

    • Hi striboulle,

      Your welcome and I’m glad I could be of help. It seems to be a real problem and I hope I can collect some fakes (at reasonable prices) to take back with me sometime for educational purposes.

      • japanesepots says:

        That it is John. I’ve picked up a couple of fake Ino like this one from the same Japanese seller the Bonsai pottery store in France bought their forgeries from, at auction very cheaply. They sell fake Inos, Makuzu Kozan, Gekkou, Yuzan, and Yusen. Not only are these fakes, I know they were purchased for a tenth of the retail value of a real one, then sold in the west for far more than retail! Sellers as well as collectors should be aware of the problem of forgeries and how to spot them to avoid getting this kind of bad reputation.

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